Week of snow and gales set for late January in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire

Snow is expected for a week.
Snow is expected for a week.

Forecasters have predicted a week of snow and gales for a week this month.

From January 18 till January 27 expected rain fall could turn to snow, says the Met Office.

A spokesman said: "The rain could turn to snow almost anywhere, but particularly across northern and central areas, especially later in this period."

The Met Office also said that it looks set to remain mainly cold, unsettled and sometimes windy, with "gales possible in the north".

Also warning that frost could become widespread and severe.

The forecast

January 22 - Rain / snow showers. Minimum Temperature 1 °C.

January 23 - Rain / snow showers. Minimum Temperature 1 °C.

January 24 - Rain / snow showers. Minimum Temperature 1 °C.

January 25 - Rain / snow showers. Minimum Temperature 1 °C.

January 26 - Rain / snow showers. Minimum Temperature 1 °C.

January 27 - Rain / snow showers. Minimum Temperature 1 °C.

January 28 - Rain / snow. Minimum Temperature 1 °C.

Martin Young, Deputy Chief Meteorologist said: “The latest forecast suggests the highest risk of any severe wintry weather is from late January and into February. Whether cold spells will be brought about by Arctic air arriving from the north or easterly flows arriving from the continent remains uncertain.

“However, before this happens we expect a rather changeable and relatively mild spell over the weekend and early next week, with some rain for most of us.

“From the middle of next week, and especially during the last week of January and into early February, there is an increased likelihood of cold weather becoming established across all of the UK.

"This would bring an enhanced risk of snow and widespread frost almost anywhere across the UK, but particularly across northern parts. However, the cold weather may not affect the whole of the UK and it is still possible that some milder and wetter interludes will intersperse this generally cold period, especially in the south.”