LETTER: People just don’t care about our NHS

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With missed hospital appointments costing the NHS billions of pounds, Professor Jane Cumming, the chief medical officer for England is “asking patients and the public to use the health service responsibly,”

For it to happen, it would need everyone in the UK, if not the world, to behave responsibly.

Appointments are largely missed because people don’t care about the health care system, e.g. drug dealers, or indeed simply don’t understand it.

And, since the NHS cares for everyone, from every other system, and from abroad, i.e. education to transport; for it to operate at 110 per cent, it needs everyone to understand precisely how every other system works, so as not to cause avoidable illness or injury.

To guard against food poisoning, health inspectors carry out regular checks of takeaways and farms etc.

To guard against injury in the work place we have health and safety laws, and safe business/working practices.

On our trains, boats and planes, we have tight controls to stop drugs and terrorists etc.

On our roads we have speed limits, but no police to enforce them.

With the amount of traffic on our roads, congestion is unavoidable, but it surely wouldn’t be anywhere as near a bad, if all drivers were as skilled and responsible as heart surgeons.

And why shouldn’t they be? Isn’t driving – like flying – a life or death operation?

We trust pilots when we fly? But can we, (the poor and disadvantaged), trust drivers when we walk and cycle?

The bottom line is: if we reduce congestion and road casualties, it means fewer missed appointments; fewer late bosses/workers; fewer patients for A&E; a healthier nation due to reduced stress/drugs, and more money

available for the NHS, e.g. the Centre for Economics and Business Research predicts the annual cost of congestion will cost the UK economy £300bn by 2030.

Meaning? Gridlock causes bedblock!

Allan Ramsay

By email