Heart-warming video shows four-year-old Derbyshire girl ringing cancer bell at Notts hospital - dressed as a Stormtrooper

Audrina Hatton-Wright has been through 14 rounds of radiotherapy for a rare and aggressive cancer.
Audrina Hatton-Wright has been through 14 rounds of radiotherapy for a rare and aggressive cancer.

This heart-warming video shows a four-year-old Derbyshire girl marking the end of her cancer treatment by ringing the hospital cancer bell - dressed as a Stormtrooper.

Audrina Hatton-Wright has been through 14 rounds of radiotherapy for a rare and aggressive cancer.

The four-year-old wanted to mark the end of her cancer treatment in her own special way

The four-year-old wanted to mark the end of her cancer treatment in her own special way

But she hasn't let it dent her spirit and proudly rang the bell at Nottingham Radiotherapy Centre after eight months of treatment.

Dressed as the Star Wars character, she was cheered on by hospital staff waving lightsabers.

Mum Gemma Gould, 28, said Audrina wanted to mark the end of her radiotherapy in her own special way.

"It was all her idea," she explained. "She's seen all the movies and has all the Star Wars Build-A-Bears. I am incredibly proud.

She dressed as a Stormtrooper to ring the bell signalling the end of her treatment

She dressed as a Stormtrooper to ring the bell signalling the end of her treatment

“She's been brilliant, she's always full of beans. It's been a long haul but she's kept us both going."

Audrina, of Derby, was diagnosed with high risk neuroblastoma - a rare childhood cancer with one of the lowest survival rates - in July 2018.

Since then she has spent her birthday in hospital, endured four operations, five rounds of chemo and 14 rounds of radiotherapy.

But even after months of treatment Audrina still needs more help.

But she still needs more help as the risk of relapse is more than 50 per cent so her family are raising money for specialist treatment in the US.

But she still needs more help as the risk of relapse is more than 50 per cent so her family are raising money for specialist treatment in the US.

Her family say the risk of a relapse with neuroblastoma is more than 50 per cent and when it does relapse there is only a one in 10 chance of survival.

They are now battling to raise £200,000 for specialist treatment in the US to help prevent a relapse.

“We want to take her to New York and get the the vaccine, it will give her a much better chance of staying cured of the disease,” said Gemma.

Her fundraising page can be found at: https://www.gofundme.com/danceforaudrina