Bins in Amber Valley will be emptied by a company nearly 150 miles away

Residents in Amber Valley will have their bins collected by a company owned by Norfolk County Council
Residents in Amber Valley will have their bins collected by a company owned by Norfolk County Council

Residents in Amber Valley will have their bins collected by a company owned by Norfolk County Council, nearly 150 miles away.

Earlier this month, Amber Valley Borough Council held a closed-doors meeting in which it debated a new contract for bin collections in the area.

Now, brief minutes of that meeting, at which members of the public and press were not allowed, have been published.

They show that the council is set to join forces with Norse Commercial Services Limited, a company owned by Norfolk County Council.

It will take over the new contract from Saturday, June 27, when its current agreement with Veolia is due to end.

Veolia has run the service on behalf of the borough council since 2005. The current cost of the contract with Veolia is £2.6 million per year.

The cost of the new deal has not yet been disclosed. This will be brought forward at a future meeting of the council’s cabinet.

The council has agreed to create a joint venture agreement with Norse which will see them create, in a way, a subsidiary organisation.

Both the council and Norse will have managers overseeing the new arrangement and both organisations will share the profits.

It says the joint agreement will “give the council greater control and influence than a traditionally outsourced operation, analogous to in-house services”.

The authority also says the “venture” will: “Enable flexibility in responding to changes in legislation and/or the council’s priorities.

“Offer the opportunity to develop a commercial approach to service delivery, with 50 per cent profit share for the council.

“Reduce the council’s client role, with indirect savings in areas such as procurement, finance, administration and human resources.”

At the closed-doors meeting, councillors approved the new waste contract agreement by a vote of 24 to 15.

The minutes of the meeting show that Conservative councillor Sean Carter asked to make a recording of the proceedings.

However, Labour mayor Coun John Walker, chairing the debate, “refused” this request because the entire meeting was supposed to be kept exempt with all information confidential.