Career in brewing industry

File photo dated 01/12/06 of a man drinking a pint of beer. The growing popularity of real ale has been shown by a big increase in ticket sales for Britain's biggest beer festival. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday June 20, 2011. The Campaign for Real Ale (Camra) said sales ahead of the event in London's Earls Court in early August were 27% up on the same time last year. Camra announced that more than 700 real ales, ciders and beers from countries including the United States and Australia will be available at this year's festival. Head of marketing Tony Jerome said: 'In the year of Camra's 40th birthday, we really hope this year's festival will be an event to remember.' See PA story INDUSTRY Beer. Photo credit should read: Johnny Green/PA Wire
File photo dated 01/12/06 of a man drinking a pint of beer. The growing popularity of real ale has been shown by a big increase in ticket sales for Britain's biggest beer festival. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday June 20, 2011. The Campaign for Real Ale (Camra) said sales ahead of the event in London's Earls Court in early August were 27% up on the same time last year. Camra announced that more than 700 real ales, ciders and beers from countries including the United States and Australia will be available at this year's festival. Head of marketing Tony Jerome said: 'In the year of Camra's 40th birthday, we really hope this year's festival will be an event to remember.' See PA story INDUSTRY Beer. Photo credit should read: Johnny Green/PA Wire

AS a technical brewer you would manage the production of beers and lagers, making sure the quality and consistency of the product is of a high standard.

You would oversee the biochemical process of brewing, which involves boiling malted barley with hops and water, and cooling and fermenting it with yeast so the natural sugars turn to alcohol.

Your work is likely to include:

l checking the temperature and quality of beer

l keeping detailed records of the brewing process

l sourcing suppliers

l making sure raw materials meet the right standard

l overseeing technical developments

Your role could also involve developing, testing and producing new beers and managing other brewery workers.

Working with a large brewery, you could be responsible for just one part of the production process, such as fermentation, packaging or quality control. In a small or micro-brewery, you are more likely to be involved in all stages of the brewing process.

You would usually work 40 hours a week. However, this work involves regularly checking the brewing process, so you are likely to work a shift system including evenings, weekends and nights.

You would mainly work in the beer production area overseeing the brewing process. This is a noisy industrial environment and you would need to wear protective clothing, which should be provided.

Salaries for technical brewers can be between £15,000 and £25,000 a year. With experience this could exceed £40,000.

Employees in micro-breweries may earn less.

To start as a trainee brewer you will usually need a degree in a related subject, such as biological science, chemistry, chemical engineering, food science/technology, microbiology or brewing and distilling.

Some employers may accept a relevant BTEC HNC/HND. You can search for courses on the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) website, and for details of entry requirements you should check with colleges and universities individually.

Many employers will also look for evidence of your ability to manage a team. Previous experience in a management role, or degree modules in business management may help show your potential in this area. You may be at an advantage if you also have some experience or knowledge of brewing or distilling. You could contact larger breweries to arrange work experience or to observe their brewing process.

An alternative way into this role may be through a combination of experience as a brewery worker and qualifications offered by the Institute of Brewing and Distilling (IBD).

Their awards include Fundamentals of Brewing and Packaging, and a General Certificate in Brewing. The mix of brewery work and IBD awards could provide the springboard to further qualifications and the opportunity to apply for trainee technical brewer posts. Once you have started with a large brewery, you will usually join a structured graduate training scheme, which may involve travelling to different production sites to gain in-depth knowledge of the company and processes.