Mystery of the lost suitcases

NEAABE120330h1, Eastwood Lyncroft primary school writing skills project. Year 3 pupils Jessica Inquiati-Lamb, Matthew Poxon, Freddie Pitts, Chloe Stack and Keira Gisborne.
NEAABE120330h1, Eastwood Lyncroft primary school writing skills project. Year 3 pupils Jessica Inquiati-Lamb, Matthew Poxon, Freddie Pitts, Chloe Stack and Keira Gisborne.

TEACHERS at a school in Eastwood planted four suitcases in the playground and told the kids they had dropped out of a plane as part of an elaborate project to improve writing skills.

Each year group was given a suitcase to investigate and the children wrote up news reports, stories and theories about how the cases arrived in the school grounds

The unique idea came from the school literary co-ordinator Irenka Arroyo, who said she thought a ‘fun activity’ might improve the kids’ focus.

“Writing is the school focus and we want to improve our writing standards. We thought a real fun activity would focus the pupils more.

“It’s been really, really good. The children have absolutely loved it. They’ve been writing without even realising they are doing it.

Children wrote up theories as to how the cases could have possibly ended up in the school grounds, before police officers came in to tell them that an aeroplane had lost some of its cargo in the Eastwood area that same week.

One of the suitcases belonged to the famous designer of Moshi Monsters, Michael Acton-Smith.

Inside, as well as clothes and sun tan lotion to make it look like he was going on holiday, was a memory stick which contained Michael’s email address. The pupils emailed him to tell him that they had his suitcase and he agreed to feature some of their Moshi Monstyer designs, which they did during the project, in his magazine and on his website.

Mrs George said: “We have spent all week on these suitcases and it’s been absolutely amazing.

“The children have made films and all sorts. The work we got out of it was incredible.

Teachers were putting police tape around the suitcases on the banks of the playground last Monday morning as the kids arrived at school to make it look realistic.

They then told the pupils that they had been in touch with the police, who had asked that the school open them up and try and work out who each one belonged to.