Marathon runners vow to compete

Medical workers aid injured people at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Medical workers aid injured people at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

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Runners bidding to take part in Sunday’s London Marathon say they are determined to do so, despite Monday’s tragic scenes in Boston.

Two separate bomb blasts near he finishing line of the American city’s yearly marathon had killed three and injured many more by the time the News went to press this week. The devices were beleived planted by terrorists.

But the shocking scenes have not deterred runners from taking part in Sunday’s London Marathon.

Paul Clarke, 35, of Swanwick, trains with Heanor Running Club and completed the Marathon two years ago. He said: “I am still planning to run 100 per cent. We don’t know who is responsible. We don’t know what we are dealing with until someone comes forward.

“I have trained too hard this winter to not do it. I don’t feel threatened to be honest. The finish line is near Buckingham Palace which will have mega high security. We are still waiting to find out who is responsible. It’s the worst thing I have heard about in athletics in a long, long time. It seems mindless. There were two more devices that didn’t explode. It could have been twice as bad.”

David Kolebuk, 45, of Langley Mill, plans to support his sister-in-law Angela O’Brian who will run the Marathon on Sunday. He said: “Life is a risk anyway. You can’t let these things stop you doing things. Everyone is happy and no one is backing out. Mr Kolebuk will cycle to London and back as part of a bid to raise cash for the CLIC Sargent charity. He will pass a relay baton to Angela for the run.

He said: “There is no hesitation in our minds. She is a headmistress she is not the sort of person to back down. I will be there to give her strategic encouragement at 13 and 23 miles when you are at your lowest ebb.”

Ripley Running Club secretary Eleanor Robinson said: “It was a huge shock and a dreadful thing to happen.”