DCSIMG

Heanor man Steven becomes top prof

nrhn 170113 Proffessor Steven Julious

nrhn 170113 Proffessor Steven Julious

A former Heanor Gate Science College maths whizzkid is celebrating after becoming one of the country’s leading medical statistics academics.

A former Heanor Gate Science College maths whizzkid is celebrating after becoming one of the country’s leading medical statistics academics.

Lecturer Steven Julious, who grew up in Marlpool, has been made a professor of his field by the University of Sheffield after 22 years designing and carrying out a range of drug trials.

The 45-year-old found his talent for maths while studying at Heanor Gate and since leaving home at 17, now has three degrees including a PhD and is a member of the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) appraisal committee.

He said: “It’s taken many years to get to where I am now in my career and this is a real recognition of the work I’ve done in the last 22 years.

Proffesor Julious left the family home at Mundys Drive in Marlpool when he was 17 to take on a degree in mathematics, statistics and operational research at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology.

He then went on to do a masters degree in biometry at the University of Reading.

Steven worked at pharmaceuticals giants Glaxo-Smith Klein after university conducting a number of clinical trials over his eight years there while completing his PhD part-time.

In 2004 he took up a lecturing role at Sheffield University where he has helped to set up its first clinical trials research unit. He has since conducted trials on medicines used for stroke recovery and other emergency remedies.

Eight years on and Steven’s professorship, which had to be approved by a panel of leading academics across the world, confirms him as tone of the country’s top brains when it comes to developing medical trials.

He is currently the chief researcher for a study to lessen the effects of asthma in school age children during term time known as PLEASANT.

“I always say I’m so lucky,” professor Julious said. “I think even if I won the lottery I would still do what I do now.

“It’s not just the research, but I love the teaching too and meeting students - especially if they stay in touch after they’ve finished.

Steven’s work with the PLEASANT trial found that there was a direct relationship between children going back to school in September and a peak in youngsters experiencing asthma symptoms.

His mother Berenice Wilson, of West Hallam, near Ilkeston, is proud of her son’s achievements. She said: “It’s an amazing achievement - he came from a humble background, I was a single mum of three children. I’m so proud of what all three of them have achieved really.”

 

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