Hunt out your glasses

Toni Woodcock''ONE of Sheffield's proudest glasses wearers was honoured today as they took a step closer to winning the coveted Spectacle Wearer of the Year Award, with a grand prize of �10,000 and a luxury holiday in the Bahamas.'Toni Woodcock, aged 41 from Sheffield, was chosen from hundreds of entries from across Yorkshire and the north east. Known as the Oscars of the glasses world, the awards celebrate specs wearers from the UK and Republic of Ireland, across four age categories: 15-24; 25-39; 40-59 and 60+.

Toni Woodcock''ONE of Sheffield's proudest glasses wearers was honoured today as they took a step closer to winning the coveted Spectacle Wearer of the Year Award, with a grand prize of �10,000 and a luxury holiday in the Bahamas.'Toni Woodcock, aged 41 from Sheffield, was chosen from hundreds of entries from across Yorkshire and the north east. Known as the Oscars of the glasses world, the awards celebrate specs wearers from the UK and Republic of Ireland, across four age categories: 15-24; 25-39; 40-59 and 60+.

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The Parish Church of St Thomas, Somercotes, is looking for any glasses in good condition to help needy people in developing countries.

Vision Aid Overseas exists as a charity to help people whose lives are blighted by poor eyesight, particularly in those cases where spectacles can help.

St Thomas has been helping the charity for ten years and has sent more than 17,000 pairs of glasses in that time.

The church checks the glasses to make sure they are of a good standard and does not send bifocals or varifocals. The charity do not need spectacle cases as they are too heavy to send overseas.

They do not want any glasses that are bent, display yellowed plastic, are badly scratched or have scuffed lenses. They cannot mend broken spectacles and do not need loose lenses or empty frames.

After checking the glasses, they are packed into a sturdy cardboard box and taken to Specsavers in Alfreton, which takes them a headquarters in Crawley free of charge.

After delivery, the glasses are sorted again to get rid of any bad ones which may have slipped through the net before they are passed onto one of the prisons which work with Vision Aid.

Selected prisoners are trained by Vision Aid to carry out a more detailed examination of the glasses before grading lenses and packing them.

The specs are then shipped overseas and given to people in countries such as Ethiopia.

If anybody has any good, unwanted glasses take them to the Nottingham Road church. You will be helping some of the world’s most unfortunate people.