Crich museum put seaside tram back on track for summer

From left: Crich Tramway Village workshop volunteer Sandy Williamson, coach painter Matthew Linaker, general manager Mike Galer, museum society president Alan Barber, and board member David Frodsham.
From left: Crich Tramway Village workshop volunteer Sandy Williamson, coach painter Matthew Linaker, general manager Mike Galer, museum society president Alan Barber, and board member David Frodsham.

Crich Tramway Village has welcomed one of its star attractions back into service after a major restoration job.

Blackpool 236 was launched back on to the tracks on Tuesday, April 25, in suitably glorious sunshine for an open-top, seaside tramcar.

Tramway Museum Society president Alan Barber congratulates volunteer Sandy Williamson on a job well done.Tramway Museum Society president Alan Barber congratulates volunteer Sandy Williamson on a job well done.

Tramway Museum Society president Alan Barber congratulates volunteer Sandy Williamson on a job well done.Tramway Museum Society president Alan Barber congratulates volunteer Sandy Williamson on a job well done.

Museum society president Alan Barber launched the tram by thanking all those involved in the restoration work, cutting the ribbon and a special cake; and inviting members of the public, staff and volunteers to take a ride.

The restoration work was undertaken during the closed winter period at the museum with the main focus on the seats and interior paint work.

Coach painter Matthew Linaker said: “The most difficult part of the work has been stripping the seats back to the original teak, which was painstaking.”

Over many hours of labour, the tram’s old toffee-coloured paint was peeled away to reveal the original woodgrain, which has now been varnished by the workshop team.

Coach painter Matthew Linaker put in hours of painstaking work on the project.

Coach painter Matthew Linaker put in hours of painstaking work on the project.

Workshop volunteer Sandy Williamson said: “The best part was how the original wood looked when we had finished it – it justified the hard graft we had put in.”

As well as the seats, the interior paintwork on the sides of the tram was changed back to its original chocolate colour.

For details of upcoming museum events, visit www.tramway.co.uk.

Youngster James Finch was one of the first passengers to enjoy the ride.

Youngster James Finch was one of the first passengers to enjoy the ride.